Best Electric Cars UK 2019

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The UK is moving to electric cars in 2019, slowly but surely: Brits bought nearly 60,000 plug-in cars last year and the next two years will see the trickle of battery vehicles turn into a flood, – as prices reduce to become more competitive with petrol and diesel cars. Drivers are increasingly looking to ditch fossil fuels, but which electric vehicle (EV) should you buy? And is an electric car right for you in the first place?

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Jaguar i-Pace

The car was unveiled at the 2018 Geneva motor show and we can now see that the styling is compatible with E-Pace and F-Pace, but with an added electric twist – and there’s electrical wizardry aplenty under the bonnet to decimate your fuel bills and a whole new lexicon of Jag driving dynamics. It stills steers, goes and stops like a Jag should, but there’s space aplenty thanks to the efficient packaging.

Jaguar i-pace

Jaguar i-Pace

The car was unveiled at the 2018 Geneva motor show and we can now see that the styling is compatible with E-Pace and F-Pace, but with an added electric twist – and there’s electrical wizardry aplenty under the bonnet to decimate your fuel bills and a whole new lexicon of Jag driving dynamics. It stills steers, goes and stops like a Jag should, but there’s space aplenty thanks to the efficient packaging.

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Audi e-Tron

The first full series electric car from Audi is a triumph: you get the usual Ingolstadt quality and driving manners, all wrapped up in a very practical SUV bodystyle, akin to a Q5 crossover. Performance is rapid, range decent and it just all feels so normal. One neat touch we really liked: twin charging ports on both front wings, meaning you can charge up on either side.

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Jaguar i-pace

Audi e-Tron

The first full series electric car from Audi is a triumph: you get the usual Ingolstadt quality and driving manners, all wrapped up in a very practical SUV bodystyle, akin to a Q5 crossover. Performance is rapid, range decent and it just all feels so normal. One neat touch we really liked: twin charging ports on both front wings, meaning you can charge up on either side.

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Hyundai Kona Electric

There’s a new electric family car in town – and it’s arguably one of the most versatile EVs on sale right now. It comes with a capacious 64kWh battery which is enough, says Hyundai, for a 292-mile range – enough for virtually all your everyday needs. Performance is predictably brisk, with 0-62mph in a hot hatch-shaming 7.6sec and we found the range was solid and reliable, averaging well over 200 miles between recharges.

Jaguar i-pace

Hyundai Kona Electric

There’s a new electric family car in town – and it’s arguably one of the most versatile EVs on sale right now. It comes with a capacious 64kWh battery which is enough, says Hyundai, for a 292-mile range – enough for virtually all your everyday needs. Performance is predictably brisk, with 0-62mph in a hot hatch-shaming 7.6sec and we found the range was solid and reliable, averaging well over 200 miles between recharges.

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Hyundai Ioniq

Hyundai offers its sensible Ioniq family car in a variety of powertrains – including a pure electric version costing £29,495. If you’re still nervous about going fully EV, you can alternatively pick a hybrid or plug-in hybrid version, providing a tad more reassurance on longer journeys. All Ioniqs have decent cabin space for families of four or five and a decent boot.

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Jaguar i-pace

Hyundai Ioniq

Hyundai offers its sensible Ioniq family car in a variety of powertrains – including a pure electric version costing £29,495. If you’re still nervous about going fully EV, you can alternatively pick a hybrid or plug-in hybrid version, providing a tad more reassurance on longer journeys. All Ioniqs have decent cabin space for families of four or five and a decent boot.

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Nissan Leaf

The world’s first mass-market electric car is back in v2.0 as a better-than-ever family electric car. Priced from around £26k, the new 2018 Nissan Leaf uses carryover mechanicals but sprinkled with a whole lot of better battery tech and a fresh wardrobe to bring it in line with the latest Nissan family look espoused by Qashqai et al. Nissan quotes a real-world range approaching 200 miles, giving the Leaf true everyday practicality creds. The interior is a bit of a letdown, but this is a very viable electric hatchback for families. We’re living with a Leaf at the moment and in the first 395 miles, we’ve used electricity costing just £13.70 – proving the cost savings available on an EV.

Jaguar i-pace

Nissan Leaf

The world’s first mass-market electric car is back in v2.0 as a better-than-ever family electric car. Priced from around £26k, the new 2018 Nissan Leaf uses carryover mechanicals but sprinkled with a whole lot of better battery tech and a fresh wardrobe to bring it in line with the latest Nissan family look espoused by Qashqai et al. Nissan quotes a real-world range approaching 200 miles, giving the Leaf true everyday practicality creds. The interior is a bit of a letdown, but this is a very viable electric hatchback for families. We’re living with a Leaf at the moment and in the first 395 miles, we’ve used electricity costing just £13.70 – proving the cost savings available on an EV.

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Tesla Model X

Need space for seven? A swanky Tesla badge? And all the modernity and clever-clogs tech the brand has become famous for? Step this way: the Model X is half crossover, half MPV, but all Tesla electric car. Famous for its cleverly hinged gullwing rear doors that open even in the tightest of car park spaces, the interior is roomy for five and the rearmost third-row seats are fine for kids on short journeys. It’s pricey though, costing from £75k in the UK for a Model X 75D entry-level model.

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Jaguar i-pace

Tesla Model X

Need space for seven? A swanky Tesla badge? And all the modernity and clever-clogs tech the brand has become famous for? Step this way: the Model X is half crossover, half MPV, but all Tesla electric car. Famous for its cleverly hinged gullwing rear doors that open even in the tightest of car park spaces, the interior is roomy for five and the rearmost third-row seats are fine for kids on short journeys. It’s pricey though, costing from £75k in the UK for a Model X 75D entry-level model.

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Tesla Model S

The Model X’s more sensible four-door saloon sibling, the Tesla Model S is the landmark electric car that set the cat among the pigeons. It’s well established now and brought a dash of executive style to the EV marketplace years before the Europeans finally caught up. It has a very long range, nudging 300 miles in many trim levels, and performance is – quite literally – Ludicrous in the higher-powered models, which can dispatch 0-60mph in around three seconds dead. These are practical saloon cars, with plenty of space for five, a fully flat floor for rear-seat passengers and there are even occasional pop-up sixth and seventh bench seats in the boot available as an option for short-haul trips. All Teslas benefit from the brand’s fledgling Supercharger network for rapid recharging.

Jaguar i-pace

Tesla Model S

The Model X’s more sensible four-door saloon sibling, the Tesla Model S is the landmark electric car that set the cat among the pigeons. It’s well established now and brought a dash of executive style to the EV marketplace years before the Europeans finally caught up. It has a very long range, nudging 300 miles in many trim levels, and performance is – quite literally – Ludicrous in the higher-powered models, which can dispatch 0-60mph in around three seconds dead. These are practical saloon cars, with plenty of space for five, a fully flat floor for rear-seat passengers and there are even occasional pop-up sixth and seventh bench seats in the boot available as an option for short-haul trips. All Teslas benefit from the brand’s fledgling Supercharger network for rapid recharging.

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Volkswagen e-Golf

Everything you like about the VW Golf, just in a cleaner, silent electric package. This is grassroots motoring, albeit at a price: the electric e-Golf starts at around £32k in the UK. For that outlay, you get all the usual Volkswagen attributes – first-rate build quality, clever connectivity and generous packaging – but with a silent powertrain that will save you plenty of cash in cheaper running costs. For many, this could be the ideal stepping stone electric car – mixing conventional looks with cutting-edge technology.

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Jaguar i-pace

Volkswagen e-Golf

Everything you like about the VW Golf, just in a cleaner, silent electric package. This is grassroots motoring, albeit at a price: the electric e-Golf starts at around £32k in the UK. For that outlay, you get all the usual Volkswagen attributes – first-rate build quality, clever connectivity and generous packaging – but with a silent powertrain that will save you plenty of cash in cheaper running costs. For many, this could be the ideal stepping stone electric car – mixing conventional looks with cutting-edge technology.

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Kia e-Niro

The electric Niro is a great example of the new breed of electric cars arriving in 2019: it’s a right-sized package and ticks lots of boxes. It’s an SUV shape, which the market is demanding. Its range is claimed at 282 miles, giving it the legs that motorists are demanding. And its UK price has been confirmed at £33k – putting it in the sweet spot of accessibility for more motorists.

Jaguar i-pace

Kia e-Niro

The electric Niro is a great example of the new breed of electric cars arriving in 2019: it’s a right-sized package and ticks lots of boxes. It’s an SUV shape, which the market is demanding. Its range is claimed at 282 miles, giving it the legs that motorists are demanding. And its UK price has been confirmed at £33k – putting it in the sweet spot of accessibility for more motorists.

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BMW i3

Until autumn 2018, you could pick your BMW i3 in pure electric or plug-in range-extender forms – but the get-you-out-of-jail petrol engine onboard is being dumped for 2019. The i3 EV is the simplest of all, and mixes clever F1-spec carbonfibre construction with futuristic styling to make a great city car. With the tightest turning circle you’ve ever driven, this tiny BMW is extremely agile around town and there’s plenty of room in both rows of seats for bodies, although a small boot is a blot on the copy book. It feels every inch a small BMW to drive, with agile handling and that Germanic precision to the controls that impart a true premium feel.

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Jaguar i-pace

BMW i3

Until autumn 2018, you could pick your BMW i3 in pure electric or plug-in range-extender forms – but the get-you-out-of-jail petrol engine onboard is being dumped for 2019. The i3 EV is the simplest of all, and mixes clever F1-spec carbonfibre construction with futuristic styling to make a great city car. With the tightest turning circle you’ve ever driven, this tiny BMW is extremely agile around town and there’s plenty of room in both rows of seats for bodies, although a small boot is a blot on the copy book. It feels every inch a small BMW to drive, with agile handling and that Germanic precision to the controls that impart a true premium feel.

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